Monday, March 16, 2015

McKeen talks writing family history | The Ridgefield Press

McKeen talks writing family history | The Ridgefield Press

"Talking" about writing my family history is as far as I've gotten...well almost.  While I dream of a book, a completed book about my family history, I have written paragraphs.  I have approached writing a family history, but the very thought of carrying through in some type of "sensical" fashion and one day arriving at a tome of published stories, has me shaking in my boots.

Is this a case of phobia?  Still, I do desire to take my research and use it for a basis for telling the family story.  McKeen has worked on it for 29 years; at this stage of my life (I'm over the hill), what can I still accomplish.  Worth thinking about?  Worth devoting some time ever Sunday toward that end?

It is up to me and you to make it happen.  Follow my blog and I'll let you know of my progress.  

Family history of prostate cancer raises a woman's risk of breast cancer



Family history of prostate cancer raises a woman's risk of breast cancer

I don't have a family history of prostate cancer, so far as I know, but I thought that this was interesting and certainly a factor that women should be aware of. 

Health history is a part of family history and as a family historian, I have always been interested in the "cause of death" section on death certificates.  Did you know that there are protocols for recording your family's health history?

Here is a pedigree health form.  Write in the cause of death for each family member and take it with you when you go to your doctor for your yearly check up.   For more information, google "family health history" or turn to Cyndislist for direction.

Friday, March 13, 2015

Partner Certification News–March, 2015

Partner Certification News–March, 2015

When partnership happens between FamilySearch and commercial enterprises, genealogists win big.  Here are some of the new toys and tools to keep your minds and technical skills growing.

Thursday, March 05, 2015

FamilyTreeNow.com - 100% Free Family Tree and Genealogy Research

FamilyTreeNow.com - 100% Free Family Tree and Genealogy Research

Dick Eastman has a thing or two to say about this site!  Read his review online or in your e-mail.  Or maybe you've seen a blurb on Facebook?  Another new site to try!

Here is what you need to know before latching onto a new website:  Who is running this website?  Who are these people?!   Somewhere, on the home page of the new web site, are tabs or buttons or so, or links.  Look for one that says ABOUT US. 

Read the blogs and newsletters, look for reviews, read the reviews.

Genealogy Gophers

Genealogy Gophers

I hope this site prospers; it looks as if the good things they are offering will be helpful.  Digital books are handy!  And dandy!  I plan to search some, right now!

Sunday, March 01, 2015

Genealogical Journal by Daniel M. Hogan (Paperback) - Lulu

Genealogical Journal by Daniel M. Hogan (Paperback) - Lulu

I found this an appealing idea for a gift for your favorite genealogist.  You can go to the local "get anything and everything" store and buy a blank notebook for less but I've learned over the years that having a "dedicated" place and time to do your genealogy is a super way to achieve success in researching your family.

Well, do you have a "dedicated" research notebook for each ancestral line you are following? Toting a notebook around (yes, I'm discussing a physical paper product, here), is occasionally easier to deal with on a research trip than a virtual type.

It's at least worth trying.  Thoughts?

Friday, February 27, 2015

Will we see you in Mobile?

Will we see you in Mobile?  

Historical associations have been super willing this last few years to put their heads together with genealogists.  Our goals are so similar and the two groups have a similar interest, in restoring what what was lost, identifying the true facts, and honoring our ancestors.  Click on the link to find out more about their April Meeting in Mobile.

Sunday, February 08, 2015

5 questions every family should ask their grandparents - Utah Valley 360

5 questions every family should ask their grandparents - Utah Valley 360

My maternal Grandfather, Richard "Ludd" Givens, passed away when I was very young.  I have no memory of him; Grandma Alice Givens died when I was about ten years of age.  I do have some memories of her and have recorded them.

There are many in my age group ("over-the-hill"), who didn't become interested in genealogy till after they retired.  Most of the older generation of our families are deceased.  In fact, we are the older generation!  So instead of doing what the article suggests, I'm going to turn it around.  Here's how:

Make sure that your grandchildren and great grandchildren know the story of your life.  Go through the list of questions in the article and adapt these five points to your situation.  Answer the questions as if your grandchildren were asking you.  If you don't have grandchildren, then answer them, anyway.  There may be a favorite niece or nephew or grand niece who would be interested.  Finally, what a great way to connect with others, such as cousins!  I'm planning to attend a reunion this summer and I would love to compare my life experiences with theirs.

Your story is worth telling and now you have some guidelines.

Family Tree Maker: 20 RootsTech talks for beginning family historians

Family Tree Maker: 20 RootsTech talks for beginning family historians

Some of the presentations are going to be available for non-attendees.  Look through this web site to find which ones are going to be live for anyone to watch and listen to.  In addition, after the conference has concluded, at some point there will be archived presentations online.

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

Hack Genealogy

Hack Genealogy

Here's a graphically fun website, with so much information you will want to celebrate!  Bookmark this one as you will return often, not only to read current info but to search their archives.

Class Notes 3

Intro to Beyond Basic Genealogy

1. You didn’t need to sign up for this class because it’s all on the Internet. T or F

2. Genetic testing brings families together. T or F
<http://www.vox.com/2014/9/9/6107039/23andme-ancestry-dna-testing>

3. All I need to find stuff on the Internet is the search engine, “GOOGLE”. T or F
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The groundwork for building a family tree-house is all about obtaining vital event information for your ancestor.

The first step by which you may identify your ancestor is his or her correct name.

Given name = First Name + Middle Name.
What’s in a Sur-Name?
A Rose by any other name?
Would Smell as Sweet?


Articles about this topic: Kimberly Powell is a well-known and dependable authority whose links can help you find articles. She was a blogger before we knew what bloggers were! About.com hosts her forum:

Another well-known source is Cyndi Howells: ; use search box at top right of page or search under categories.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Second Step in establishing the correct identity for your ancestor is obtaining the date and place for his vital life events (BMD's). Again, be as accurate as you can be. The experienced genealogist will tell you that this step becomes more important as times go on and that revision is frequently necessary.

Third Step: Relationships are KEY! Was your grandfather the oldest child in his family? Or the youngest? Did he have more than one wife? Who were his siblings? Where did his mother and father come from? Who lived next door? Who did he hang around with? A favorite cousin?

Other identifiers might include: nationality, ethnicity, heritage, culture, occupation, military service, education, religion, appearance, health factors, and residences.

What about BMD's?